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Tiwi Storm Clouds

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The Top End

The Darwin Region covers the area of Darwin City south to just beyond Adelaide River, east to the border of Kakadu National Park and west to Wadeye. It also incorporates the Tiwi Islands.

The Katherine Region encompasses the areas of the Gulf of Carpentaria (with the townships of Borroloola and Robinson River), Roper Bar, Mataranka, Katherine, Nitmiluk National Park, Pine Creek, and Victoria River.

The Arnhem Region extends from Port Roper on the Gulf of Carpentaria around the coast to the East Alligator River where it adjoins Kakadu National Park. The major centres are Jabiru on the Kakadu National Park border, Maningrida on the Liverpool River mouth and Nhulunbuy (Gove) in the far north-east, on the Gove Peninsula.

Darwin Region


The Darwin region covers the area of Darwin City south to just beyond Adelaide River, east to the border of Kakadu National Park and west to Wadeye. It also incorporates the Tiwi Islands.

The region includes landmarks such as the Tiwi Islands, Adelaide River (the township), Litchfield National Park, Daly River area, Wadeye (Port Keats) and Mary River Reserve.

Weather:

The Top End has a tropical savanna climate with distinct wet and dry seasons. The temperature does not vary greatly throughout the year, with the average maximum temperature 32 degrees Celsius year-round, with varying humidity.

The dry season runs from April/May to October. There is very little rainfall between May and September. In the coolest months of June and July, the daily minimum temperature may dip as low as 14 degrees Celsius. The dry season is seen by many as paradise; weeks of clear blue skies with temperatures in the low thirties, with cooler nights – ideal for camping, swimming and exploring the many natural outdoor attractions.

The wet season is associated with tropical cyclones and monsoon rains. The majority of the rainfall occurs between December and March, when thunderstorms are common. Relative humidity averages over 70 per cent during the wettest months.
The wet season appeals to many people, with its dramatic tropical lightning shows, and torrential downpours followed by sunny days with high humidity.

Events:

Much of the city’s social activities take place at open air markets, outdoor festivals, in parks and reserves, by the beach or on boats, either on Darwin Harbour or the Mary River system.

Major events are the Arafura Games (every second year), Mindil Beach Sunset Markets, the Darwin Cup, the Adelaide River Cup, the Darwin Festival, the Beer Can Regatta, Australian Sprint Car Championship, Bass in the Grass, Darwin to Ambon Yacht Race, Greek Glenti, NT Indigenous Music Awards, Tiwi Islands AFL Grand Final and the Reel Women Barra Classic.

Places to See:

Litchfield National Park, East Point Reserve (Military Museum), Tiwi Islands, Berry Springs, Territory Wildlife Park, Crocodylus Park, The Darwin Entertainment Centre and Skycity Darwin Casino.

Things to do:

Fishing, camping, golfing, sailing, horse racing, AFL, walking, cycling, waterskiing, concerts, night clubbing, visit aboriginal art shopping.

Darwin is well placed for an overseas week-end away – Singapore is a 4.5 hr flight from Darwin, Bali is a 2.5 hr flight.

Culture:

The traditional owners of the Darwin area are the Larrakia people.

Darwin has grown from a pioneer outpost and small port into one of Australia’s most modern and multicultural cities. Its proximity to Asia makes it an important Australian gateway to countries such as Indonesia and Timor-Leste.

After the Second World War, Darwin’s population experienced rapid growth, with significant numbers of Italian and Greek immigrants arriving in the 1960s and 1970s. A significant percentage of Darwin’s residents are recent immigrants from South East Asia.

Landscapes:

Empty beaches with sea breezes, scenic stretches of parklands, nature parks with waterfalls and springs.

 

Kathering Region

The Katherine Region encompasses the areas of the Gulf of Carpentaria (with the townships of Borroloola and Robinson River), Roper Bar, Mataranka, Katherine, Nitmiluk National Park, Pine Creek, and Victoria River.

Weather:

The area around the township of Katherine experiences a tropical savanna climate with distinct wet and dry seasons. The annual rainfall is 1,132mm and daily temperatures range from 24 to 35 degrees celsius, occasionally reaching 40 degrees celsius. There is very high humidity during the build-up period leading in to the wet season.

Floods and severe thunderstorms and lightning are familiar dangers during the wet season.

Culture:

East of Katherine, the area is home to four main indigenous language groups- Yanuwa, Mara, Kurdanj and Karawa.

Landscape:

The Katherine region is a relatively remote area with abundant waterways including gorges, rivers, waterfalls and the ocean and the entire area is scantily populated.

The Katherine area has been described as where the outback meets the tropics.

East of Katherine are some of Australia’s largest cattle stations, some are the size of small European countries.

Events:

Annual fishing competitions, Katherine canoe marathon, the Katherine Country Music Muster, Pine Creek Goldrush Festival, Merrepen Arts Festival, Barunga Festival, Rodeos and camp drafting events, the annual Katherine Show, Borroloola Gulf Show, Devil’s Claw Festival, Mataranka Never Never Festival.

Places to see:

The Lost City, Lorella Springs, Borroloola, King Ash Bay, Roper River Bar, Sir Edward group of Islands, Mataranka, Katherine, Nitmiluk National Park, Pine Creek, Daly River region and Victoria River region.

There a six gazette national parks and more than ten nature parks, reserves and conservation areas, such as the Cutta Cutta Caves Nature Park, Katherine Hot Springs, Katherine Low Level Reserve, Limmen National Park and the Keep River National Park.

Things to do:

Swimming in rock pools, canoeing, camping, bushwalking, four wheel driving, bird watching, panning for gold and fishing.

Arnhem District (incorporating Kakadu National Park)

The Arnhem region extends from Port Roper on the Gulf of Carpentaria around the coast to the East Alligator River where it adjoins Kakadu National Park. The major centres are Jabiru on the Kakadu National Park border, Maningrida on the Liverpool River mouth and Nhulunbuy (Gove) in the far north-east, on the Gove Peninsula.

Nhulunbuy is the site of large scale Bauxite mining with an associated aluminium refinery.

The district’s administrative centre is the town of Nhulunbuy, the fourth largest population centre in the Northern Territory.
The region picks up landmarks such as Ramingining, Galiwinku (Elcho Island), Gapuwiyak (Lake Evella), Yirrkala, Gunbalanya (Oenpelli), Cobourg Peninsula, Croker Island, Goulburn Island, Maningrida and Millingimbi and Kakadu National Park.

Weather:

The climate of Arnhem Land is tropical monsoon with distinct wet and dry seasons. Temperatures do not fluctuate widely throughout the year, though it can range from overnight lows of 15 degrees celsius in the dry season (April to September) to daily highs of 33 degrees Celsius in the wet season (October to March).

Culture:

Yolgnu culture and ties to the land are still very strong and sacred. Many people still live mainly a traditional life. It is important for visitors to remember that Yolngu own the entire Arnhem Land region and it is important to respect Arnhem Land’s access restrictions.

Events:

Arnhemland Bird Week and Aboriginal Cultutal Adventure around Maningrida. Garma Festival each August at Gulkula near Nhulunbuy.
Gove Peninsula Festival. Stone Country Festival held at Gunbalanya (Oenpelli)

Places to see:

Gove, Yirrkala, the islands, beaches of the coastline, rivers, Mt Borradaile, the waterholes throughout Arnhem Land, Cobourg Peninsula incorporating Port Essington, Kakadu National Park, Jabiru, ERA uranium mine site, Nourlangie Rock, Ubirr and Aboriginal rock art.

Things to do:

Fishing, diving, exploring by foot or boat, bird watching, camping, visiting arts and craft centres. At Gove there are sports grounds, a golf course, yacht club, swimming pool, fishing club, surf-lifesaving club, speedway and skate parks.

Gove is serviced daily by Qantas with flights to Darwin or Cairns.

Landscapes:

This Aboriginal-owned expanse is made up of wild coastlines, deserted islands, rivers teeming with fish, lush rainforests, soaring escarpments and savannah woodlands.
Arnhem Land is one of the best fishing destinations in the world and is also renowned for its rock art.

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"Empty beaches with sea breezes, scenic stretches of parklands, nature parks with waterfalls and springs. "

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